American Nurseryman Magazine - Horticulture Magazine and Horticulture Books - What's Trending - May, 2014 - DEPARTMENTS

American Nurseryman Magazine - Horticulture Magazine and Horticulture Books - May, 2014

DEPARTMENTS

What's Trending

Right Now on Facebook:

The American Institute of Architects has revealed its pick of the top ten green buildings in the US for 2014 http://ow.ly/wfhFN

Variously called tropical spiderwort, Indian dayflower and jio, this pest is a particularly successful weed in field nurseries as well as in row crops. It is tolerant of many herbicides. It also is difficult to remove by cultivation or by hand. http://ow.ly/vYADm

The National Garden Bureau has designated 2014 to be the Year of the Echinacea http://ow.ly/vYAgF

Enticing Edibles - So many choices, and they all look delicious. How do you choose which fruits and vegetables are right for your inventory? We've selected only 10 here, but you're bound to find just the right selections. 'Jelly Bean' blueberry is pictured. http://ow.ly/vYAGW

Report: Green industry holds its own in a period of slow growth and uncertainty about critical legislative matters http://ow.ly/uJksO

From NurserymanSite.com

Starting a Nursery Business

Does anyone own a nursery on here or have considerable knowledge about them? I have commercial property and the finances to open a nursery and would like to know about ROI, high/low times of year, etc about it.

You can reply here or send an email to HawkinsInvestments@Live.com

Thanks!

Dalen

Response:

this is really involved.

If you own the right kind of property, you can get agricultural tax breaks too.

I never had a retail nursery per se. I Re-wholesaled. It was mainly for my own stock, but I also sold to other guys.

Customers could come into my nursery to 'shop' but all the prices were "installed" prices.

IF they wanted, I would load the plants into their truck, SUV whatever but the prices were the prices and they were "installed" there was no benefit to taking them home yourself.

Still many people bought stuff from me because prices were still lower than retail nurseries.

form an ROI stand point, I think it only worked because I had several overlapping revenue streams that complimented each other, I didn't see it work as a stand alone revenue stream.

If you were thinking retail nursery it takes a lot of time, effort and focus.

IF you are thinking just stocking yur own lanes that you mostly turn over in the same year, you would see a faster ROI.

Much of the cost of buying plants is taking care of them, and shipping them.

If you receive a trailer load of plants you can realize significant savings.

That's why I prefer to spend February, March and April Pre-selling a whole season.

Then you know ahead of time 90% of the installs you are going to do based on the designs you've sold.

Then bring in whatever extra plants you need to fill a trailer or two or three depending on your work load.

Some of the plants will either end up int he bone yard (rejected, etc) and need to be healed in, and excess plants can be re-wholesaled to someone else.

I have set up several of these on large scales for other companies,

But, I have never seen a tremendous ROI without already being an installer yourself.. its more of a 'savings' and realized additional profit, than it is an 'earnings' in and of itself.