Clip and save this handy guide to biological and chemical controls to help you in your integrated pest management program.


White pine aphid.
COURTESY OF JOHN A. WEIDHASS, VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY; BUGWOOD.ORG

Integrated pest management (IPM) is not so much a collection of products as it is an approach, a program. Once considered to be innovative, it’s become standard procedure as growers across the country have adopted the common-sense course of action that includes scouting and prevention as well as application of chemical and biological controls.

In planning to incorporate IPM, growers follow general guidelines, which include setting an action threshold. This entails evaluating the possible pest threats as well as environmental conditions, and then determining the point at which control action must be taken. A few sightings – the result of careful scouting and observation – may not require intervention. But at what level of infestation does a pest become an economic threat?

Proper cultural practices should be employed in an attempt to prevent pests, but that doesn’t guarantee an infestation will never occur. Careful monitoring helps to identify threats, a critical step in any successful control program. Accurate, precise identification will help to prevent misuse of chemical applications, should an infestation imperil the plants.


Native holly leafminer.
COURTESY OF JIM BAKER, NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY; BUGWOOD.ORG

Redheaded pine sawfly caterpillars.
COURTESY OF USDA FOREST SERVICE – REGION 8 – SOUTHERN ARCHIVE, USDA FOREST SERVICE; BUGWOOD.ORG
Company Name URL
Agrium Advanced Technologies www.agrium.com
Arborjet Inc. www.arborjet.com
BASF www.agproducts.basf.us
Bayer CropScience www.bayercropscience.com
Becker Underwood www.beckerunderwood.com
BioWorks Inc. www.bioworksinc.com
Bonide Products Inc. www.bonide.com
Central Life Sciences www.centrallifesciences.com
Certis U.S.A. LLC www.certisusa.com
Chemtura AgroSolutions www.chemturaagrosolutions.com
Cleary Chemical www.clearychemical.com
Dow AgroSciences www.dowagro.com/turf
Environmental Horticulture LLC www.treerx.com
Garden Tech www.gardentech.com
Garden Ville www.garden-ville.com
Green Light Co. www.greenlightco.com
Lebanon Turf Products www.lebanonturf.com
Monterey Lawn and Garden Products Inc. www.montereylawngarden.com
OHP Inc. www.ohp.com
Quali-Pro www.quali-pro.com
Summit Chemical Inc. www.summitchemical.com
Syngenta Professional Products www.syngenta.com
Valent www.valent.com

Red oak borer flight intercept.
COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS FOREST ENTOMOLOGY LAB ARCHIVE, UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS; BUGWOOD.ORG

If controls become necessary, the grower weighs the options available to provide the most effective method that also poses the least threat to plant and environment.

Common sense, but effective.

Whether you’re a grower, a landscape professional or a garden center retailer, you probably already practice some form of IPM. So you know how to track down, locate and identify the most common threats to your plants. (Or you rely on a local Extension agent to be your trusty detective.)

The trickier part is determining what needs to be done once an infestation is confirmed. You can do nothing and hope the situation resolves itself. You can count on mechanical means to rid your valuable plants of the threat, using such methods as sticky traps or a blast of water. But if your evaluation leads you to conclude that further intervention is required, you’ll have to choose among the myriad selections of biological and chemical controls.

To make your task just a bit easier, we’ve compiled a list of companies that offer products designed to help you battle the pests that threaten your crops and your livelihood. We need to state, however, that inclusion in the list does not imply an endorsement by American Nurseryman or Moose River Media. If you work with a product or company that’s not included here, we’d like to share that information with our readers. Contact your colleagues at www.nurserymansite.com, or visit us on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/AmericanNurserymanMagazine.


Silverleaf whiteflies.
COURTESY OF SCOTT BAUER, USDA AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE; BUGWOOD.ORG

Sawflies on pin oak.
COURTESY OF ERIC REBEK, OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY; BUGWOOD.ORG